Last blog post

recs

 

This is the last blog that will be posted on this site as the website will no longer be independently maintained.

Language Rich Europe is a network funded through the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Commission. It was co-ordinated by the British Council which also made a significant financial contribution and elicited the support of sponsors. Perhaps more important than this financial and organisational underpinning was the fact that the British Council, traditionally associated with its global support for British culture and the English language was taking a lead on a project which was unequivocally promoting multilingualism within Europe. This belief is very much at the heart of its promotion of diversity and inclusion worldwide. The Language Rich Europe partnership involved 20 countries and three regions and in addition to the British Council offices it brought together over 30 partners – cultural agencies such as Instituto Camões and the Goethe Institut, universities, and research and information centres. A particular role was played by Tilburg University whose colleagues developed and co-ordinated the Europe-wide research which was published in 19 languages in Language Rich Europe: Trends in Policies and Practices for Multilingualism in Europe.

In March 2013 the Language Rich Europe network of partners presented 10 key recommendations at the European level to the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and the European Commission and made a further 80 recommendations at country and regional level. Language Rich Europe’s legacy will be marked by the extent to which these become embedded in policy and practice.

The British Council will continue to promote networks such as Language Rich Europe which help transform understandings of languages and reflect their richness as a vital contribution to social and economic development globally. A new initiative Language Rich Africa will be looking at ways – at both policy and practice levels – to inspire positive attitudes towards multilingualism as key to a stable and prosperous Africa.

Meanwhile key outputs of the Language Rich Europe will be made available on the British Council websites, and for more information contact Adrian.odell@britishcouncil.org

With thanks

Simon Ingram-Hill
Project Director, Language Rich Europe

Applications open: British Academy School Language Awards 2014

Last year, the British Academy awarded a total of £60,000 to schools, colleges and other providers, including supplementary schools, to encourage excellence in language learning.

In 2014, the British Academy is again offering a series of Awards throughout the UK for projects that encourage larger numbers of students to take languages to advanced and degree level.

Further information

Universities must make languages relevant

20101203-011635.jpgThe numbers of students studying languages degrees is at its lowest in a decade – universities must make their academic study more pertinent, argues Professor Katrin Kohl, vice-chair of the Faculty of Modern Languages at the University of Oxford.

Learning a language is not only tough but may be dull unless it involves intellectual challenges, cultural attractions, and communicative rewards.

Find out more

 

Languages 2014 – 2025: are we set fair for the challenge?

 The real significance of Language Trends

Bernardette Holmes, Speak to the Future’s Campaign Director, comments on research published on 25 March, 2014.

Language is the keyThe publication of the 12th in the series of annual research exercises, Language Trends 2013-2014 carried out under the joint direction of CfBT and the British Council provides us with an up-to-date appraisal of language provision in English schools.  The benefit of this report is in its longevity.  It is the only survey which has collated annual data drawn from a sample of state maintained and independent secondary schools over this critical period in the development of language policy.

Read more

English schools not ready for language curriculum change

Primary and secondary schools in England are worried they will not meet new requirements to effectively teach languages, a report from the British Council and CfBT Education Trust has found.

The Guardian online – English schools not ready for language curriculum changehttp://bit.ly/1j2tmHY